HELIPORT LIGHTING SYSTEM

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Heliport Lighting System:

  1. FATO Perimeter Lights
  2. TLOF Touchdown Lights
  3. Landing Direction Lights
  4. Floodlighting
  5. Lighted Wind Cones
  6. Heliport Beacons
  7. Heliport Lighting Controllers

 

A – FATO Perimeter Lights

Final Approach & Takeoff Area (FATO). A defined area over which the final phase of the approach to a hover, or a landing is completed and from which the takeoff is initiated. FAA recommends a minimum of sixteen (16) green perimeter lights with spacing not to exceed 25- ft. ICAO recommends white lights spaced not to exceed 5-meters. In practice, many smaller helipads use eight (8) lights. These lights may be semi-flush inset, low surface mounted at less than 6-inch height or elevated on FAA frangible couplings. The light source may be LED or incandescent. LED lights are available with optional NVG compatibility as described in the catalog.

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B – TLOF Touchdown Lights

Touchdown and Lift-off Area (TLOF). A load bearing, generally paved area, normally centered in the FATO, on which the helicopter lands or takes off. The TLOF lights, when not doubling as the FATO, are semi-flush and vary in number and pattern. They are generally symmetrical with the FATO lights and thus closer spaced. The light source may be green LED or incandescent. LED lights are available with optional NVG compatibility as described in the catalog.

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C – Landing Direction Lights

FAA recommends a five (5) yellow landing direction lights for each preferred direction of approach extending in a line with 15-ft spacing. These lights may be semi-flush inset or elevated on FAA frangible couplings. The light source may be LED or incandescent. LED lights are available with optional NVG compatability as described in the catalog.

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D – Floodlighting

Floodlighting must not present glare to the pilot or be so bright as to interfere with aircraft operations. It is not necessary to provide an even footcandle level across the pad. The floodlights will generate cones of light across the landing surface that will provide depth perception to the pilot by eliminating the “black hole” effect.

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E – Lighted Wind Cones

A PWC wind cone may be FAA L-807 style with a rigid hinged base pole and overall height of about 22-ft. This type is normally for ground mounting. Or it may be FAA L-806 type lightweight and about 10-ft tall. The 806 is usually installed on a roof with Point Lighting safety options including a stainless steel tether. Both styles use the same 8-ft long tapered windsock and the same internal or external lighting. The light source may be LED or incandescent. The wind cone should be sited away from obstructions that may interfere with the actual prevailing wind pattern. It should be clear of the landing surface and at right angles to the preferred direction of approach if possible.  

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PWC-8071L   PWC-8061L

                                                                                                      

F – Heliport Beacons

The PHB Point Heliport Beacon is a medium intensity flashing signal for the pilot to locate the site. It should be mounted at the highest point anywhere on the site visible in 360-degrees.

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PHB-37001 PHB-37001 MT

                                                                                     

G – Heliport Lighting Controllers

Point Lighting Corporation will customize the standard controller types to suit the new and existing heliport site lighting circuits.

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PHC-61003 SPU-10770

 

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PRC-65001   PHC-61001

 

More information please visit   http://www.pointlighting.com